M 62 (NGC 6266, GCL 51) Globular Cluster in Ophiuchus

Located at: RA 17 hours 01 minutes 13 seconds, Dec -30 degrees 06 minutes 44 seconds

Size: 15' Magnitude: 6.4 Class: 4

North is up

West to the right

Telescope:

 14.5" f5 Newtonian reflector stopped to f6 (12")

Camera:

Miranda Laborec 35mm camera, manually guided, hypered Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film, 30 F outside temp

Image:

No filter, 50 minutes, 06/04/1995

Processing:

D-19, 7.0 minutes @ 68F, 35mm negative scanned with Polaroid SprintScan 4000 (4000 dpi)

Scan is a crop from 35mm negative, scan processed in Photoshop CS5.1

Location:

 Mt Pinos, CA

Notes: This is one of the Messier objects not currently 'visible' from my Thousand Oaks observatory ... In an effort to 'fill in' my Messier images page, I will post what film images I have. This is a recent (06/26/2012) scan, as I had hooked up my scanner to capture the last few Messier film negatives for this project.

Most of the film scans from the 14.5" f5 Newtonian reflector were centered on the object of interest, and were generally scanned to file as a 2000 x 2000 pixel crop of the 35mm negative.

Reduced in Photoshop to 1024 pixels, and saved under "Save for Web & Devices".

From the NGC / IC Project:

Contemporary Visual Observation(s) for NGC 6266
NGC 6266 = M62 = E453-SC14
17 01 12.5 -30 06 44
V = 6.6;  Size 14.1

18" (7/9/02 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): at 171x this is a very striking 
globular set in a fine star field.  The halo is very irregular and elongated due 
to a flattening along the SE side.  The halo is easily resolved into several 
dozen faint stars, many in strings and chains.  A long string of stars extends 
from a mag 10.5 star off the SE side along the east edge of the halo.  The 
center is very compressed with a large, blazing core.

13": very bright nucleus, asymmetric appearance with a flattened SE region.  The 
outer halo is very mottled and just resolves into many faint stars at 220x.

8": bright nucleus, nonsymmetric-fans out to the W.  A few very faint stars are 
resolved at the W edge.

- by Steve Gottlieb