NGC 2911 / NGC 2914 (UGC 5092, Arp 232 / UGC 5096, Arp 137) Galaxies in Leo

Center of field at approximately: RA 09 hours 33 minutes 51 seconds, Dec +10 degrees 06 minutes 49 seconds

Size: 4.1' x 3.1' / 1.0' x 0.6' Magnitude: 12.5 blue / 14.1 blue Class: SA(s)0: pec / SB(s)ab

North is up

West to the right

Telescope:

 14.5" f5 Newtonian reflector

Camera:

 ST-8XME, self-guided, binned 1x1, temp -20c, camera control MaxIm DL 4.56

Image:

Lumicon Red filter, 620 minutes (62 x 10 minute subs), 04/12/13/14/2018; seeing 2.9-6.5 per CCDStack

Processing:

CCDStack 2.94.6355.18107, Photoshop CS5.1

Location:

 Rolling Roof Observatory, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 (+34d 13m 29s -118h 52m 20s)

Notes:

I finally had three clear nights in a row ... However, the first two had poor to crummy seeing (best sub was 4.5 arc seconds); third night was more or less 'normal' seeing.

From the NGC / IC Project:

NGC 2911 = Arp 232 = UGC 5092 = MCG +02-25-003 = CGCG 063-007 = PGC 27159

09 33 46.1 +10 09 09

V = 11.5;  Size 4.1'x3.2';  Surf Br = 14.2;  PA = 140d

17.5" (2/20/88): moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated, bright core, faint stellar nucleus.  Brightest in a group with NGC 2914 4.8' SE and UGC 5093 8.1' SSE.  Forms a close pair with PGC 27167 1.3' ENE (misidentified as NGC 2912 in RNGC, PGC and Megastar).  In Lowrey's 48", PGC 27167 appeared faint, small, round, low even surface brightness, 15"-18" diameter.  A mag 16.1 star is 26" E.

13.1" (4/29/84): fairly bright, fairly small, round, distinctive small bright nucleus. 

8" (4/24/82) : faint, small, diffuse.

William Herschel discovered NGC 2911 = H II-40 = h608 on 11 Mar 178 (sweep 163) and recorded "A nebula between two pretty considerable stars.  Brightest in the middle, but not cometic.  Faint and perhaps 30" dia, almost R and the extremities of it lose themselves gradually."  He swept the field again on 3 Mar 1786 and discovered nearby NGC 2914.

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NGC 2912

09 33 56.9 +10 11 33

V = 16.1

17.5" (2/20/88): mag 14.3 star situated 3.6' NE of NGC 2911.  Misidentified as a "nova" by Schultz.

Herman Schultz discovered NGC 2912 on 3 Apr 1870 with the 9.6-inch refractor at Uppsala Observatory and recorded "eF; follows h608 [NGC 2911] some seconds about 2' N; but not observable".  I'm not sure of the meaning of his last comment but 1.3' ENE of NGC 2911 is PGC 27167, an extremely faint and small, low surface brightness galaxy, which the RNGC identifies as NGC 2912.

But this galaxy is too faint to be included in the CGCG and MCG and is extremely unlikely to have been seen by Schultz with a 9.6" scope.  I missed detecting this galaxy in my 17.5" and it was not found by Bigourdan, though of course it was not difficult in Lowrey's 48".  Instead, Corwin suggests NGC 2912 more likely refers to a mag 14.3 star 3.6' NE of NGC 2911.

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NGC 2914 = Arp 137 = UGC 5096 = MCG +02-25-006= CGCG 063-010 = PGC 27185

09 34 02.8 +10 06 31

V = 13.2;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 15d

17.5" (2/20/88): faint, very small, slightly elongated.  A mag 15 star is off the east edge 36" from the center.  A mag 11 star lies 1.6' NW. Forms a trio with NGC 2911 4.8' NW and UGC 5093 4.8' S.

13.1" (4/29/84): faint, very small, faint stellar nucleus.

 William Herschel discovered NGC 2914 = H III-513 = h609 on 3 Mar 1786 (sweep 534) and recorded "eF; vS; stellar; 240 verified it."  His position is 1.4' NW of UGC 5096 = PGC 27185.  He has a similar offset error for nearby NGC 2911, the previous object is the sweep.  Dreyer recorded from Birr Castle "F, S, R, bM, vF star 3/4' following.

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